New Graphic Medicine: Feb 2020

Here is the graphic medicine book coming out in February 2020. These lists will be about books that I have not yet read. If I have had the opportunity, I will let you know what I thought. If you have read one or more, please leave a comment about what you thought!

Note: I was only able to find one graphic medicine title for this month. I am sure there are more out there that I have missed! Let me know!

Go to Sleep (I Miss You) by Lucy Knisley

Release Date: February 25, 2020

This is a collection of strips about becoming a parent and all the sad, frustrating, funny, and sweet moments that come with it. It is the followup to Kid Gloves, which chronicles her pregnancy and the difficult and dangerous birth.

 

If you know of any that I missed, leave a note in the comments! Thank you for reading. If you would like to support me financially, I have a Patreon.

2 thoughts on “New Graphic Medicine: Feb 2020

  1. Hi Alice-

    Do you happen to know of any artists working with patient experience? I am working on a project related to patient experience and capturing the qualitative data from interviews. I am most comfortable as a graphic recorder, so leaning into capturing visual data is a bit of a steep learning curve for me. Any individuals or sites you could refer me to?

    Thank you in advance, Nelle

    On Tue, Feb 11, 2020 at 3:45 PM Alice Jaggers on Graphic Medicine wrote:

    > Alice Jaggers posted: ” Here is the graphic medicine book coming out in > February 2020. These lists will be about books that I have not yet read. If > I have had the opportunity, I will let you know what I thought. If you have > read one or more, please leave a comment about what yo” >

    Like

    1. I don’t know of anyone else doing that specifically. Most of the graphic medicine patient experience content is from cartoonist who chronicle their personal health journey, which is highly specific to them. You might look into some art therapy resources, which might look at visuals around patient experience. The easiest thing to do would be to ask what images pop into patients’ minds during your collection of other data. If possible, ask them to use a crayon or a pencil to draw an image. They wouldn’t have to “know how to draw” to do that (see ‘Crayon Revolution’ chapter of the Graphic Medicine Manifesto). Of course if you have them draw, you would have to gain their permission to keep and potentially distribute their art when you publish your research. I hope that helps!

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